Posts Tagged Hyper-V

Microsoft tech•ed Europe 2009, Berlin, 12 November 2009

Slighty shabby and a late start to Thursday following the Windows Server 2008 R2 EAP dinner followed by the 1E TechEd party – a heavy night! 

For the dinner, the UK team chose a fabulous Italian restaurant called Bacco (www.bacco.de/english/restaurant/restaurant.html) which I’d definately go back to and hosted a great evening… many thanks to Stuart, Gareth, Neil, Alex, etc. from Microsoft UK. 

We were also joined by Allen Stewart & Rajesh Dave from corp.  Allen is Principal PM for Windows Server and Raj is a PM for Windows Hyper-V.  Both very interesting & incredibly knowledgable guys with deep understanding across a wide range of topics (and not just Microsoft!).
I pestered them for info on Hyper-V thin provisioning of memory and whilst they couldn’t confirm anything as we all said ‘we live in hope!’ 😉 

…as for the  night, I’d been invited to the 1E TechEd Europe party at Spindler & Klatt www.spindlerklatt.de – an uuber trendy restaurant/club in East Berlin frequented by the likes of Angelina, Clooney, and now Cook! 

What a great party and many many thanks to the team at 1E (www.1e.com).  Did I mention I was the 4th member of the business in the founding year?  (yes I probably did & several times.. lots to drunk! ;-)) We went our separate ways in 1999, oh for a slice of that now… anyway, moving on! 

Seriously though hats off to Samir, Mark, and Phil – they have built a company that knows how to throw a great party (regarded as the best at TechEd), and a team of very bright, talented people who have a lot of respect for the company and its founders. 

Ouch my head is pounding!  time to go to sessions, starting with… 

ITS211 Keeping Your CIO Happy: Microsoft Office SharePoint Server 2007 SLA Scorecarding with Operations Manager 2007 and SQL Server 2008

Gordon McKenna & Sean Roberts speaking at TechEd
Presenters: Gordon McKenna, Sean Roberts, www.inframon.com
Thu 11/12 | 10:45-12:00 | London 2 – Hall 7-1b
Learn how you can create CIO level SLA scorecards in SharePoint Server 2007 for Microsoft System Center Operations Manager 2007 using some of the new features in Microsoft SQL Server 2008 Reporting Services and to create Executive SLA views of your Operational Environment. The session looks at why these types of views are important to many companies, what impact this can have on your business, and what simple steps you can take to achieve very effective, high-level executive views of everything from performance and availability of your key LOB services and applications, whether important SLAs and KPIs are being achieved and whether your IT department is meeting the day-to-day needs of your business. The key demos in this session take you through the steps you need to implement effective business scorecarding in SharePoint Server 2007 using key metrics collected in the Operations Manager 2007 Datawarehouse based on “real-world” experiences gained from the field. After attending this presentation you will have a good insight into how CIO Scorecards can help you add value to your Operations Manager deployments, helping you to show real value to your executives.
Tip – to remove parameter data from Ops Mgr reports imported into a SharePoint webpart, suffix the url with &rc:Parameters=collapsed
Cracking session from Gordon & Sean on how to try and keep your CIO happy (if that’s possible! ;-))
blog Daniel Savage

Service Level dashboard – free solution accelerator dashboard on Microsoft 

SVR401 & 402 DirectAccess Technical Drilldown, Part 1 of 2: IPv6 and Transition Technologies + Part 2 of 2: Putting It All Together

John Cradock presents DirectAccess Technical Drilldown, Part 1 of 2: IPv6 and Transition Technologies 

Presenter: John Craddock (www.xtseminars.co.uk)
Thu 11/12 | 13:30-14:45 | Helsinki – Hall 7-2a
Take a sprinkling of Windows 7, add Windows Server 2008 R2, IPv6 and IPsec and you have a solution that will allow direct access to your corporate network without the need for VPNs. Come to these demo-rich sessions and learn how to integrate DirectAccess into your environment. In Part 1 learn about IPv6 addressing, host configuration and transitioning technologies including 6to4, ISATAP, Teredo and IPHTTPS. Through a series of demos learn how to build an IPv6 Network and interoperate with IPv4 networks and hosts. In Part 2 we add the details of IPSec, and components that are only available with Windows 7 and Windows Server 2008 R2 to build the DirectAccess infrastructure. Learn how to control access to corporate resources and manage Internet connected PCs through group policy. Part 1 is highly recommended as a prerequisite for Part 2.
John Craddock is an extremely talented AD/identity expert, and deeply technical across many other fields – in this case IPv6 & DA.
I was also lucky enough to have a drink with John and my old Microsoft PSS chum Paul Duffy on Monday night at the cleverly named hotel ‘Berlin Berlin’.
John is a genuine international industry expert and a thoroughly nice bloke with it!   Paul, another ‘genie-I’ went on to become PM for Office Communicator and knows a thing or ten about OCS amongst other subjects to a deep level.  This probably explains why these two know each other!
Anyway, back to the session plus my own notes, links, etc.
Gems & Tips
– be careful, not all apps will be compatible – test!
– to be native will likely mean new network gear, is new network layer (layer 2 unchanged)
– hex is back!  use of double colon notation, but can only be used once per address
– cannot mix with ipV4 mask bit notation
– host derived with mac address which has privacy issues, Win7 & R2 generate random based on interface, can be disabled (revert to mac based) with netsh interface ipv6 set global randomizeidentifiers=disabled
– route print -6 will show IPv6 route table
– ::1 is IPv6 loopback
– if you have a registered IPv4 address then you automatically have an IPv6 address on the 6to4 network
6to4 http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/6to4 states 6to4 performs three functions:
  1. Assigns a block of IPv6 address space to any host or network that has a global IPv4 address.
  2. Encapsulates IPv6 packets inside IPv4 packets for transmission over an IPv4 network using 6in4.
  3. Routes traffic between 6to4 and “native” IPv6 networks.

– you need to manually unblock ISATAP entry in DNS which can be done via the registry or command line, e.g. 

C:\>dnscmd /config /globalqueryblocklist wpad 

Registry property globalqueryblocklist successfully reset.
Command completed successfully. 

ISATAP is a huge subject in it’s own right, the Intra-site Automatic Tunnel Addressing Protocol Deployment Guide is available at http://www.microsoft.com/downloads/details.aspx?familyid=0f3a8868-e337-43d1-b271-b8c8702344cd&displaylang=en 

Putting it all together..

– Check tunnel endpoint authentication using ‘klist’ to list Kerberos data
– Use NRTP to direct DNS queries to a specific server for a particular names space (view using ‘netsh namespace show effectivepolicy’)
– PKI needs to be right as certificates are the foundations
– you must publish the revocation list
– NLS (Nework Location Server) is just a https website accessible from the DA server, e.g. nls.corp.example.com
– if it doesn’t work, it could be a couple of days troubleshooting! 

If you’re thinking of setting this up in a virtual lab, I also took note from Allen Stewart’s blog at http://blogs.technet.com/wincat/

…if you’re planning to virtualize your lab environment on Hyper-V, you should ensure you’re using Legacy Network Adapters for the child partition where you’re running the DAS. Using the default synthetic NICs is OK for all the other resources in the test lab, but for the DAS itself, it’s important to have both the Internet and Corpnet NICs as legacy ones, to ensure proper passing of traffic between both sides of the DAS. If you use the default synthetic adapters, you may end up in a situation where traffic doesn’t properly flow from the outside to the inside, even though all your IPsec, 6to4, Teredo, and IP-HTTPS settings are correct. Basically, you’ll be in a situation where connectivity will fail at a basic level, with you not even being to successfully ping the internal DNS server using its ISATAP address.If you’ve already built your lab on Hyper-V using the synthetic adapters, the fix is pretty simple. Just replace them with legacy ones, reconfigure the IP addressing as specified in the guide and rerun the DirectAccess wizard, again supplying all the information specified in the guide. After doing so, all your traffic should flow properly.

– Thanks Allen!

DAT312 All You Needed to Know about Microsoft SQL Server 2008 Failover Clustering

Presenter: Gopal Ashok
Thu 11/12 | 17:00-18:15 | London 3 – Hall 7-1b
There are major architectural changes in SQL Server 2008 for failover cluster setup and management, geared towards increased reliability and high-availability. To learn all the benefits and changes, attend this session for a comprehensive overview direct from the product development group. We cover SQL Server 2008 failover clustering setup, underlying Windows Server cluster and how SQL Server uses it, what’s new in SQL Server 2008 for failover clustering, differences from previous versions of SQL Server and future directions. This includes details of SQL Server 2008 failover clustering setup operations together with demos to illustrate the new setup.

– new features
– applications need retry mechanisms built in to provide seamless failover
– no longer have to take down the cluster to upgrade, supports rolling upgrades 

Want to deploy stretched clusters?  lots do.  As in separate geo-redundant clusters, not separate nodes e.g. 

Stretched SQL Clusters or the doodles of an artist?

Stretched SQL Clusters or the doodles of an artist?

– sql 2008 failover clustering install breaks on windows server 2008 R2 and needs to be slipstreamed with SP1 (If only we knew this last weekend!)
(slipstreaming is incorporating patches into the installation media to effect a higher level of install base over RTM – Microsoft tend to do this but not always quickly!)
see http://blogs.msdn.com/psssql/archive/2009/03/17/how-to-fix-your-sql-server-2008-setup-before-you-run-setup-part-ii.aspx for more info
– during upgrades to a 2-node cluster there will be a period of time when you are exposed to node failure, and must not have a failover attempt for fear of corruption.  removing the node from the cluster owners will stop premature attempted failover. 

Further Microsoft resources.. (will add others also) 

      SQL Server ® 2008 Failover Clustering White Paper: http://sqlcat.com/whitepapers/archive/2009/07/08/sql-server-2008-failover-clustering.aspx 

      Recommended  Books Online  Doc Refresh #7 (May, 2009), or later: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms130214.aspx 

      Failover Clusters – Getting Started: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms189134.aspx 

      Rolling upgrade process and best practice: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms191295.aspx 

      Maintaining a Failover Cluster: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms178061.aspx 

      Setup command line usage: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms144259.aspx 

      Configuration.ini file usage: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/dd239405.aspx 

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WS2008-R2 Add Roles Hyper-V cannot be installed..

When trying to automate the build/deployment of Windows Server 2008 R2 Enterprise Edition (Full install) using scripts for adding roles and features beware using “start /w ocsetup Microsoft-Hyper-V” as this may break your server from successfuly performing a Hyper-V install..

If you do use that script then something (quite a lot) happens and various components appear to be installed including a restart.  Don’t be fooled in thinking Hyper-V has installed as when checking, Hyper-V isn’t listed as an installed Role and the management tool is not installed…

Later attempts to use the Add Roles Wizard to add Hyper-V reports it cannot be installed, giving this error dialogue:

Hyper-V-cannot_install

The processor on this computer is not compatible with Hyper-V. To install this role, the processor must have a supported version of the hardware-assisted virtualization, and this feature must be turned on in the BIOS.

eek!  but my x64 bit server has hardware virtualisation support hasn’t it..?!?!?   of course the answer is yes, but this what you will see on a box that hasn’t.

After rebuilding my test platform I realised the fix to this was to revert the attempted Hyper-V scripted install by using:
start /w ocsetup Microsoft-Hyper-V /uninstall
Allow the Windows Optional Component Setup dialogue to restart when prompted

Hope this helps save you a rebuild!

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Hyper-V Server R2 RC failover cluster to Enterprise/full version RTM…

A couple of months ago I wrote about the joys of upgrading your Hyper-V R2 release candidate cluster to a new version (e.g. release code).  This process involved tearing down and destroying your cluster which can be a complete pain on many levels (not just for your users! ;-))

Anyway, on this occasion I’m attempting to upgrade a Hyper-V R2 Release Candidate failover cluster to Enterprise RTM full product without destroying the cluster (although rebuilding the nodes clean – this is a must to be supported).

What this means is that from Beta->RC and from RC->RTM, you will have to do the following:

1. Move workloads onto fewest node/s

2. Move ownership of Storage from the node you are going to remove and rebuild.  You may need to stop the cluster service if th Quorum will not move (it will if you force it by stopping the service ;-))

3. Using ‘Failover Cluster Manager’ drill-down on Nodes, and right-click on the non-primary node, chose More Actions…, Evict – you’ll get a message warning that evicting a node can cause problems if a clustered application requires that node.. obviously! – click ‘Evict node NODENAME’

3.5. Move the node out of the domain back to a workgroup (so we can reuse this name) and delete the computer account from AD

4. When it comes to the last remaining node in the cluster, due to Quorum requirements, you will need to destroy the cluster.  Select the cluster, goto More Actions… select Destroy the Cluster

5. Remove the ‘Failover cluster virtual network name account’ from AD Users & Computers

5. Being slightly paranoid, I also disabled the Failover Clustering service from with Hyper-V Configuration and removed the machine from the domain (back to a workgroup)

3. Wipe/Reload with new version of Hyper-V.

4. Create new 1 Node Cluster, join to SAN etc

5. Move VMs, offline, to new Hyper-V host.

a. Upgrade VM’s IC’s

6. Wipe/Reload remaining host

7. Join it to the cluster

8. Smile, before you do the same for RTM… 😉

 

  1. Configure Clustering
    1. Install the Windows Server Failover Clustering feature
      from a cmd shell “start /w ocsetup FailoverCluster-FullServer”
    2. Configure Shared Storage
      Use iscsicpl.exe, if the service is not started then start it – click ‘Yes’
      Use Quick Connect to connect to the iSCSI Target, click ‘Done’ to list the targets
      Connect to the Quorum target, then add the volume
      Repeat adding the other cluster volumes (VHDs, Data, Logs, etc.)
    3. Add the new node to the Failover Cluster
      Use Failover Cluster Manager to validate the cluster
      Add the node to the cluster even if validation fails (it will if node O/S is different)
    4. Modify Hyper-V Settings for the cluster
      Change the location of VHDs and VMs to:
      C:\ClusterStorage\volume1\hyper-v\
  2. Move virtual machines and correct network errors on the target node
    1. Use Hyper-V VM Settings to correct the network setting if they report a Configuration Error
  3. Start the VM’s on the new node J
  4. Rebuild the next one..  😉

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Windows Server 2008 R2 & Hyper-V Cluster upgrades or not…

Ahh the joys of participating in beta programs! 😉

 As part of my day job, and as co-founder of IT consulting firm “The Full Circle” www.thefullcirle.com – a Microsoft Gold Partner that likes to keep ahead of the game (or at least stay in it!) by being an early adopter, we are always working with new software and that means building and rebuilding boxes.  Clearly virtualisation can make huge savings, especially in time but not always, especially when working with beta & pre-release software…

Our current journey of discovery is clustering with Windows Server 2008 Release 2 (R2) which is currently in late stages of development (went RC about month ago), and we are delighted to be a UK Early Adopter Program partner! 🙂

We have been working with a couple of different builds, the beta build 7000, and recenly the Release Candidate build 7100.  Our own infrastructure was built using the beta, as is our customer EAP project, and following a number of cluster issues we performed an in-place upgrade to the RC code…

However, last week I learnt that in-place upgrades to clusters are not supported across beta/pre-releases to RC, and eventually to RTM – this is often the case as would never be a mass adopter / real-world scenario.

What this means is that from Beta->RC and from RC->RTM, you will have to do the following:

1. Move workloads onto fewest nodes (1 in my case)

2. Using ‘Failover Cluster Manager’ drill-down on Nodes, and right-click on the non-primary node, chose More Actions…, Evict – you’ll get a message warning that evicting a node can cause problems if a clustered application requires that node.. obviously! – click ‘Evict node NODENAME’

3. When it comes to the last remaining node in the cluster, due to Quorum requirements, you will need to destroy the cluster.  Select the cluster, goto More Actions… select Destroy the Cluster

4. Remove the ‘Failover cluster virtual network name account’ from AD Users & Computers

5. Being slightly paranoid, I also disabled the Failover Clustering service from with Hyper-V Configuration and removed the machine from the domain (back to a workgroup)

3. Wipe/Reload with new version of Hyper-V.

4. Create new 1 Node Cluster, join to SAN etc

5. Move VMs, offline, to new Hyper-V host.

a. Upgrade VM’s IC’s

6. Wipe/Reload remaining host

7. Join it to the cluster

8. Smile, before you do the same for RTM… 😉

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Hyper-V Server R2 with WS2008 R2 iSCSI SAN PoC

today (and this week) I’ll mostly be building a Microsoft Hyper-V Server R2 (Beta) with Windows Server 2008 R2 (Beta/RC build 7100) iSCSI SAN Proof of Concept enviornment..

Hardware platform:

PoC – Virtual Machine Hosts (x2)
HP ProLiant ML110 G5 Xeon 3065 2.33/1333 Dual-Core, 1x1GB, 250GB Non Hot-Plug SATA, DVD±RW, Gigabit Ethernet
4 x 2GB Unbuffered ECC PC2 6400 DDR2 SDRAM
1 x HP NC360T PCI Express Dual Port Gigabit Server Adapter
 
PoC – SAN Shared Storage (iSCSI, Desktop SATA)
HP ProLiant ML110 G5 Xeon 3065 2.33/1333 Dual-Core, 1x1GB, 250GB Non Hot-Plug SATA, DVD±RW, Gigabit Ethernet
4 x 1GB Unbuffered ECC PC2 6400 DDR2 SDRAM
 
2 x HP 250GB Hard Drive
2 x Seagate ST3100340AS 1TB Hard Drive SATAII 7200rpm *32MB Cache* (OEM)
1 x HP NC360T PCI Express Dual Port Gigabit Server Adapter

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Windows Server 2008 64-bit on the ThinkPad T61p…

 
After reading Keith Combs’ excellent Blahg post on the same subject at http://blogs.technet.com/keithcombs/archive/2008/02/01/installing-windows-server-2008-ee-on-a-lenovo-thinkpad-t61p.aspx I thought I’d try and update (things move quickly in 64-bit software support) and continue where he left off… Making WS2008 64-bit on a T61 your production machine…

I’ve gone for two approaches, the first is simply using imagex to backup and restore (into Hyper-V child/virtual) a T61 Vista laptop, and in parallel adding the other nice ThinkPad devices and system software to the Windows 64-bit (Vista or WS2008 ) ThinkPad build that made the ThinkPad the market leader in the first place – beyond awesome build quality – awesome system software to help productivity, management, and ultimately improve the RoI and reduce support costs (even if you are supporting yourself ;-))

I’d be tempted to start with the ThinkVantage System Update, at the time of writing this was v3.13.  System Update allows you to pick and install all of this lot plus more from a single, simple GUI – just beware the local repository can get quite large especially if you start installing monsters like the Rescue and Recovery programs (600+MB!).  The local repositor is by default in C:\Program Files\Lenovo\System Update\session – you can clear down all folders bar ‘schedulerupdater’ & ‘system’ and next time you run the update the folders will be recreated but without the actual downloaded binaries, etc.

Intel(R) Chipset Software Installation Utility
Lenovo System Interface Driver
ThinkPad Power Management Driver
Intel Matrix Storage Manager Driver for Windows Vista 64bit

Ricoh 4-in-1 Media Card Reader Driver for Windows Vista/XP

ThinkVantage Fingerprint Software Windows 64-bit
ThinkVantage Client Security Solution for Vista 64-bit ?

SoundMAX audio driver
UltraNav
NVIDIA Video
Wireless LAN
Maintenance Mananer
Productivity Centre

ThinkPad Mobility Center Customization

Adobe Flash Player for
Microsoft(R) Windows(R) XP and Vista (32 and 64 bit)

query on:
Windows Vista Update Modules KB932063 (Fix for Several problems occur on a Windows Vista-based computer when you work in a wireless network environment)
Windows Vista Update Modules KB929191 (Vista disk enumeration optimizations are disabled on IBM and Lenovo computers)

Whilst not all links mention 64-bit in the title (I’ve kept the titles true to the ThinkVantage System Update as of April 20th 2008) this does not mean they are not 64-bit such as the Ricoh 4-in-1 Card, if you read the detail you will see mentioned “Summarized Windows Vista x86/x64 drivers”

I’ll be adding more to this post and fleshing out the links during the week of 28th April as I  should have plenty of time and, hopefully, the resources to hand get this right as attending the Windows Essential Business Server (formerly “Centro”) partner airlift to Microsoft in Redmond 🙂

http://www.win2008workstation.com/wordpress/

http://blogs.msdn.com/vijaysk/archive/2008/02/11/using-windows-server-2008-as-a-super-desktop-os.aspx

 http://forum.thinkpads.com/viewtopic.php?p=415745&sid=9e3ca7f83f86984fec5e4560f78f979b

Hyper-V & Hybernate, Standby, etc.. http://www.ditii.com/2008/09/24/hyper-v-enable-sleep-hibernate/
you can have Hyper-V installed but not started by the following registry setting:

Windows Registry Editor Version 5.00
[HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Services\hvboot]“Start”=dword:00000003

When you start your Hyper-V laptop you will have full access to the power management fucntionality 🙂
If you need to demo a VM, I can start Hyper-V with the command:

net start hvboot
(Power management is then disabled again until the next reboot)

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Windows Server 2008 Server Core setup scripts & common commands

In a previous post I talked about setting up Windows Server 2008 Enterprise Edition 64-bit to be a Hyper-V platform, Microsoft’s recommendation is for the Virtual Machine host to be running Server Core – dig out your old PC-DOS or MS-DOS commands then apply 20+ years of updates 😉

Server Core is all about the command line and scripting and I was recently lucky enough to have attended a Microsoft Hyper-V RDP bootcamp in which we covered Server Core deployments, this and having trawled various blog posts but not being able to find a single source for common Hyper-V server core setup commands made me want to document the setup scripts I used to allow quick and easy replication and, of course, for all dev environments – frequent rebuild!

These are listed in the order I would perform them to either minimise security or network ‘steps’ (such as name registration order):

To enable Automatic Updates and force an immediate update (apparently you can also define a schedule – for non-managed servers we only allow Saturday at 03:00)
[sc-enableAU.cmd]
cscript \windows\system32\scregedit.wsf /au 4
net stop wuauserv
net start wuauserv
wuauclt /detectnow

To enable Terminal Services access
[sc-enableTS.cmd]
cscript \windows\system32\scregedit.wsf /ar 0
cscript \windows\system32\scregedit.wsf /cs 1

(for help on what commands are available via scregedit type cscript \windows\system32\scregedit.wsf /?)

To rename the local computer name
[sc-renamecomputer.cmd]
hostname
netdom renamecomputer <old_host_name> /newname:<new_host_name>
rem – a shutdown /r /t 0 will be needed to restart the computer for the change to be applied

To change the workgroup name
[sc-changeWGroup.cmd]
rem usage sc-changeWGroup <host_name> <workgroup_name>
hostname
wmic computersystemwhere name=”%1″ call joindomainorworkgroup name=”%2″
rem – a shutdown /r /t 0 will be needed to restart the computer for the change to be applied

To list the status of Hyper-V and install it (assumes any pre-req patches such as RC0)
[sc-enableHV.cmd]
oclist | find “Hyper-V”
ocsetup Microsoft-Hyper-V

To rename the new virtual switch interface from the default Local Area Connection 3
[sc-renameLAN3.cmd]
netsh interface set interface name = “Local Area Connection 3” newname = “Local Area Connection – Virtual”

Script to set IP, mask, G/W, & DNS servers
[sc-setIP.cmd]
rem changes ip address by script
rem usage – sc-setIP <ip address> <subnet mask> <gateway> <dns1> <dns2>

netsh interface ipv4 set address name=”Local Area Connection – Virtual” source=static address=%1 mask=%2 gateway=%3

netsh interface ipv4 add dnsserver name=”Local Area Connection – Virtual” address=%4 index=1
netsh interface ipv4 add dnsserver name=”Local Area Connection – Virtual” address=%5 index=2

netsh interface ipv4 show config | more

To open WMI for Hyper-V remote administration
[sc-openWMI.cmd]
winrm quickconfig
netsh advfirewall firewall set rule group=”Windows Management Instrumentation (WMI)” new enable=yes
net localgroup “Distributed COM Users” /add Admin-TFCSupport

or to open a WorkGroup server for full remote administration…
[sc-openRA-WGroup.cmd]
netsh advfirewall firewall set rule group=“Remote Administration” new enable=yes

[sc-setIP.cmd]
rem changes ip address by script
rem usage – sc-setIP <ip address> <subnet mask> <gateway> <dns1> <dns2>

netsh interface ipv4 set address name=”Local Area Connection” source=static address=%1 mask=%2 gateway=%3

netsh interface ipv4 add dnsserver name=”Local Area Connection” address=%4 index=1
netsh interface ipv4 add dnsserver name=”Local Area Connection” address=%5 index=2

netsh interface ipv4 show config | more

[sc-enableICMP]
netsh firewall set icmpsetting 8

(or to simply disable the entire firewall… netsh firewall set opmode disable)

[sc-setNTP.cmd]
w32tm /configure /manualpeerlist:pool.ntp.org,212.111.32.110,0×8 /syncfromflags:MANUAL
net stop w32time
net start w32time
w32tm /resync /nowait

Of course, a lot of these commands are not just specific to Server Core but can be also run on full versions of WS2008, the new Hyper-V Server soon to be launched, or indeed Vista.
One last great command line line tool to confirm many of the outcomes and changes executed by the commands detailed here is ‘systeminfo’ – try it!

update… two excellent resources that expand way more than I have time to are:
http://blogs.technet.com/server_core/
http://msmvps.com/blogs/ad/archive/2008/09/18/admin-s-guide-to-server-core-commands.aspx

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